Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

jarulest:

women: *are killed, beaten, raped, and put down constantly for hundreds of years just for being women*

woman who is also a feminist: *cracks a joke about men on the internet*

men: ”see this is the problem with feminism it promotes hate speech they’re no better than sexist men why can’t i punch women in the face and why does the guy have to pay on dates #equalitarianism”

(Source: kimyefanclub, via partyapparatchik)

bettie-n-love:

tarragonable:

fuckyeahsexeducation:

fckdiamondsigotspinach:

exgynocraticgrrl:

Porn Actress Exposes Industry: Trafficking in the Porn Industry - The Pink Cross

Elements of Sex Trafficking

Act: Recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons;

Means: Threat or use of force, coercion, abduction, fraud, deception, abuse of power or vulnerability, or giving payments or benefits to a person in control of the victim;

Purpose: Prostitution of others, sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, or slavery.

- From the 2000 UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, ratified by 154 countries. (x)

[Highlighted elements of sex trafficking in the porn industry connect with the examples Lubben gives in this specific gifset, other elements do occur in the porn industry as well].

—-

"The federal Trafficking Victims Protection Act defines the crime of human trafficking as:

A. The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for the purpose of a commercial sex act where such an act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age, or

B. The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.” - (x)

—-

… [P]ersons are trafficked into the international sex trade, often by force, fraud, or coercion. The sex industry has rapidly expanded over the past several decades. It involves sexual exploitation of persons, predominantly women and girls, involving activities related to prostitution, pornography, sex tourism, and other commercial sexual services. The low status of women in many parts of the world has contributed to a burgeoning of the trafficking industry. -
The Victims of Trafficking and Violence Prevention Act (TVPA). TVPA combats trafficking in persons, especially into the sex trade, slavery, and involuntary servitude. It has been reauthorized three times since its initial passage: (x)

—-

THAT IS RAPE

We need to be talking about this and we need to be making sex work safe. No one should be made to feel like this treatment is okay.

This needs to be seen and people need to speak out about it.

This is horrifying and mainly why I refuse to ever do straight porn. It’s not worth it. We need to retrain the industry and make sure this shit stops happening right now.

(via thenewwomensmovement)